A true leader asks real questions

Asking an insightful question instead helps them to focus on what they want to do and when that insight happens, they can move forward with clarity and commitment.

“The person who asks questions is more helpful than the person who offers advice.” – James Clear

What happens in the brain when you ask a question?

When you ask a question instead of answering, the entire brain gets active as it reflects, releasing a neurochemical called serotonin. This encourages gathering intelligence from all areas of the brain, allowing for more insight than would happen if you provided solutions to others.

What part of the brain is engaged when questions are asked?

One of the parts of the brain that helps with this is called the reticular activating system (RAS). This is part of the brain that gets activated when questions are asked and helps you find answers by gathering intelligence from all areas of the brain.

Now, for leaders, in particular, let’s look at:

The neuroscience of asking insightful questions

As a leader, it’s important to know that when you solve problems for the people who report to you, you rob them of the chance to do their own thinking.

Asking an insightful question instead helps them to focus on what they want to do and when that insight happens, they can move forward with clarity and commitment.

There are plenty of reasons and benefits to ask questions like “What would you do?” or “What possibilities do you see here?” These are open-ended, thought-provoking questions, not solutions disguised as questions.

Neuroplasticity: The first thing you need to know is that the brain isn’t hardwired like an electrical appliance. If it was, people would be stuck doing things the way they’ve always been done.

Neuroplasticity means our brain can physically change to encourage creative thinking and new knowledge.
Questions can act as a catalyst for our brains to change and move forward with new insight.

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