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Christmas table settings

Fill red bowls with candy canes and line bowls down the middle of your table.

Here are some simple, inexpensive ways to jazz up your Christmas table.

For an eco-natural look, run a garland of greenery down your table and scatter with dried or green leaves, interesting shaped seeds and pinecones.

Fill goblets and wine glasses with baubles, Christmas decorations and ribbon and dot around the table.

Fill red bowls with candy canes and line bowls down the middle of your table.

Place cards double as table décor. Attach handwritten gift tags to candy canes and tuck them into serviettes for a punchy place setting. Place a large, pillar candle on a cake stand and scatter Christmas ornaments around the candle.

This will work particularly well if you’re working with a colour scheme.

String a wreath with a few lengths of ribbon and hang it above your table – great if you have a small table and lots of dishes! For even more impact, group a few wreaths together, allowing them to dangle over your Christmas feast. Attach baubles and ornaments to chair backs using silky ribbons – this will add pizzaz without taking up space on your table.

Christmas carol music sheets make for quirky place mats and will add a whimsical touch to your table.

Throw a red table runner down the length off your table and add twinkling fairy lights for a festive look.

Use strings of beads, particularly in festive gold and other metallic colours, to decorate tableware.

String a Christmas banner from one wall to the other so it hangs over your table.

Many things can go wrong in the water – swimming coach.
Roodepoort — Head coach of Florida Swimming Club and Orcas Swimming Academy, Tracey Hemphill says that it is possible for anyone to drown and she hopes her input can prevent such a tragedy from occurring this Festive Season.
“We at Orcas swimming say: ‘Prevention is better than cure’ and hope that this article generates awareness for water safety. Rather be prepared, do a first-aid course, get your children water safe and always take care,” she says.
“There seems to be a misconception that only people who struggle in water can drown. Well this is not the case and proven time and time again in the most unexpected conditions.
“American swimmer Fran Crippen was a six-time US National Champion. He won national titles in the 800m freestyle, two in the 5km open-water swim and two in the 10km open-water swim. He died on 23 October 2010 during a FINA open-water event in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). His body was found by divers at the final buoy, about 500m from the finish, 90 minutes after the completion of the race .
“It later was determined that he died from a cardiac abnormality, uncontrolled exercise-induced asthma and unfavourable environmental race conditions. His death sparked investigations into race safety and physiological conditions that can cause sudden death.
“Fran was a member of the swimming community who would have been in tune with his physiological condition, and who should have been able to identify possible problems. However, he did not and he died unnecessarily.
“We at Orcas swimming experienced a similar incident on Tuesday 15 October, when one of our competitive age group swimmers lost consciousness during the second set of the training session.
“The swimmer, who was being observed by assistant coach Irene Bussey, went into the tumble turn at the end of the pool and didn’t come up after that. Irene quickly recognised that there was a problem and dived into the pool to pull the swimmer to the surface where she was attended to by Irene and Tamarin Lawson. Both women have many years of first-aid training and lifesaving experience, and quickly were able to stabilise the swimmer until the ambulance arrived.
“It is suspected that the swimmer had a seizure of sort, and lost consciousness. The swimmer has no history of epilepsy, seizures or cardiac conditions and will be undergoing tests to try and determine what exactly caused the loss of consciousness.
“But thankfully this story has a happy ending and only because of the fast responses of these two ladies who were able to recognise a problem quickly and respond appropriately.
“The swimmer spent three days in ICU at Life Wilgeheuwel Hospital where she has recovered well and will be resuming her swimming training as soon as conclusive tests clear her to do so.
“Too often we take it for granted that our child can swim and is comfortable in the water or even a very competent swimmer, so we leave them to carry on unobserved.
“It caught us by complete surprise, but the staff at Orcas Swimming were prepared and ready to deal with a potentially devastating situation”.
Florida Swimming Club will be running first-aid and CPR courses for those who are interested in becoming competent at dealing with an emergency. Orcas Learn to Swim Centre is open from Monday 13 January 2014.
Please get your child booked in to any water-safety programme.
For enquires for the first-aid courses or to book your child into our programme, please call Tracey on 083 399 1205, or email orcasadmin@gmail.com/ orcas@mweb.co.za.
Wishing you all the best for the Festive Season.

Head coach of Florida Swimming Club and Orcas Swimming Academy, Tracey Hemphill says that it is possible for anyone to drown and she hopes her input can prevent such a tragedy from occuring this Festive Season. (EDT WK 2; CLINTON 11 JANUARY; SWIMMING)
Many things can go wrong in the water – swimming coach.
Roodepoort — Head coach of Florida Swimming Club and Orcas Swimming Academy, Tracey Hemphill says that it is possible for anyone to drown and she hopes her input can prevent such a tragedy from occurring this Festive Season.
“We at Orcas swimming say: ‘Prevention is better than cure’ and hope that this article generates awareness for water safety. Rather be prepared, do a first-aid course, get your children water safe and always take care,” she says.
“There seems to be a misconception that only people who struggle in water can drown. Well this is not the case and proven time and time again in the most unexpected conditions.
“American swimmer Fran Crippen was a six-time US National Champion. He won national titles in the 800m freestyle, two in the 5km open-water swim and two in the 10km open-water swim. He died on 23 October 2010 during a FINA open-water event in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). His body was found by divers at the final buoy, about 500m from the finish, 90 minutes after the completion of the race .
“It later was determined that he died from a cardiac abnormality, uncontrolled exercise-induced asthma and unfavourable environmental race conditions. His death sparked investigations into race safety and physiological conditions that can cause sudden death.
“Fran was a member of the swimming community who would have been in tune with his physiological condition, and who should have been able to identify possible problems. However, he did not and he died unnecessarily.
“We at Orcas swimming experienced a similar incident on Tuesday 15 October, when one of our competitive age group swimmers lost consciousness during the second set of the training session.
“The swimmer, who was being observed by assistant coach Irene Bussey, went into the tumble turn at the end of the pool and didn’t come up after that. Irene quickly recognised that there was a problem and dived into the pool to pull the swimmer to the surface where she was attended to by Irene and Tamarin Lawson. Both women have many years of first-aid training and lifesaving experience, and quickly were able to stabilise the swimmer until the ambulance arrived.
“It is suspected that the swimmer had a seizure of sort, and lost consciousness. The swimmer has no history of epilepsy, seizures or cardiac conditions and will be undergoing tests to try and determine what exactly caused the loss of consciousness.
“But thankfully this story has a happy ending and only because of the fast responses of these two ladies who were able to recognise a problem quickly and respond appropriately.
“The swimmer spent three days in ICU at Life Wilgeheuwel Hospital where she has recovered well and will be resuming her swimming training as soon as conclusive tests clear her to do so.
“Too often we take it for granted that our child can swim and is comfortable in the water or even a very competent swimmer, so we leave them to carry on unobserved.
“It caught us by complete surprise, but the staff at Orcas Swimming were prepared and ready to deal with a potentially devastating situation”.
Florida Swimming Club will be running first-aid and CPR courses for those who are interested in becoming competent at dealing with an emergency. Orcas Learn to Swim Centre is open from Monday 13 January 2014.
Please get your child booked in to any water-safety programme.
For enquires for the first-aid courses or to book your child into our programme, please call Tracey on 083 399 1205, or email orcasadmin@gmail.com/ orcas@mweb.co.za.
Wishing you all the best for the Festive Season.

Head coach of Florida Swimming Club and Orcas Swimming Academy, Tracey Hemphill says that it is possible for anyone to drown and she hopes her input can prevent such a tragedy from occuring this Festive Season. (EDT WK 2; CLINTON 11 JANUARY; SWIMMING)

Cover a square or rectangular shaped vase with candy canes and fill the vase with red carnations for a unique and eye-catching centrepiece.

Place a large bauble, a single rose and a few evergreen sprigs on a dinner plate. Cover the arrangement with a cloche for an elegant centrepiece.

Cover empty tin cans with Christmas wrapping paper; fill with flowers and sprigs of greenery and dot around your table for festive pops of colour.

Use Scrabble tiles to spell out a seasonal message. Place on a platter and accent with ornaments, springs of greenery and ribbons.

Create a trip down memory lane. Choose a selection of photographs from Christmases past and place two photos back-to-back on memo clips, so you’ll be able to see a picture no matter where you sit. Arrange the photos on a cake stand or plate and intersperse with baubles and Christmas

decorations.

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