Thobani Ngqulunga
2 minute read
4 Dec 2013
00:00

Many RTI job candidates were too old

Thobani Ngqulunga

EVIDENCE at the RTI Commission of Inquiry yesterday revealed that many of the 40 700 people short-listed for 90 traffic officer posts did not meet the criteria for the job as they were too old...

EVIDENCE at the RTI Commission of Inquiry yesterday revealed that many of the 40 700 people short-listed for 90 traffic officer posts did not meet the criteria for the job as they were too old.

The Health Department’s legal representative, advocate Thulani Khuzwayo, was interrogating Transport Department general manager for human resources Miranda Sindi Zwane on how the department short-listed so many people for only 90 jobs.

“Surely this doesn’t sound right [for] human resources to short-list 40 700 people for 90 posts,” he said.

But Zwane insisted that the law says that if a person qualifies then they must be short-listed. “From my personal perspective I would not have short-listed them and I would have stopped the process, but I could not,” she said.

Khuzwayo then produced a schedule with the names of participants and asked Zwane if that was the correct schedule. She confirmed it was.

Khuzwayo asked Zwane to read out the first four digits of the identity numbers of some of the short-listed candidates.

The criteria for eligible candidates was that they must not be more than 35 years old. The first four digits of the ID number for one of the participants indicated that he had been 44 years old.

Khuzwayo then pointed out others who were also more than 37 years old and said, “the list goes on and on”.

“Do you see my point? There’s more but it would take a long time to finish,” said Khuzwayo, referring to the names of people that should not have been short-listed.

Zwane then asked if she could double-check with the department if that was indeed the correct list.

She indicated her embarrassment at realising that unqualified people may have been short-listed.

The commission granted her permission and adjourned so that the commission can today establish if indeed this was the correct schedule.

Earlier, advocate Nomsa Khuzwayo of SA Legal Aid for the families of the dead victims said by not stopping the event, Zwane had shown that she did not care about saving lives, but only cared about her goal to ensure that the recruits were sent to the traffic training college in January.