Kavith Harrilal
1 minute read
29 Sep 2008
00:00

Training awards for PMB firms

Kavith Harrilal

Four Pietermaritzburg-based companies have scooped awards from Seta (Sector Education and Training Authority) for manufacturing, engineering and related services (Merseta) — honouring them as “Top Training Companies” and supporters of the national skills development strategy.

Four Pietermaritzburg-based companies have scooped awards from Seta (Sector Education and Training Authority) for manufacturing, engineering and related services (Merseta) — honouring them as “Top Training Companies” and supporters of the national skills development strategy.

Maritzburg Engineering, Ben Booysen, Ramsay Engineering and Hulamin are the four Merseta award-winning companies that have contributed significantly toward training and development over the past few years.

Each company has been given a substantial discretionary grant over a two-year period for further training and development.

The grant is an incentive to promote and support training interventions in Merseta organisations, said Mark Anderson, client liaison officer at Merseta’s KwaZulu-Natal office.

“To offset training costs, companies ensure that when training their staff, [their] intention is to create a culture of training and development in our country, assisting in alleviating the critical crisis we face of skills shortages.”

The levy-paying companies have been rewarded for successfully completing the majority of the targeted training initiatives set out in their workplace skills plans.

Companies were also required to submit workplace skills plans and an annual training report.

In addition, they had to have an active training committee in place, said Sid Moodley of Ramsay Engineering.

“Training is a costly expense and it is nice to have the support from Merseta,” said Trusha Pillay of Maritzburg Engineering.

“It is an honour to be recognised for training. We have trained more than half of the air-conditioning apprentices in KZN,” said Steve Reddy of Ben Booysen.

“Merseta is working and it is great that companies are getting recognised for building up Pietermaritzburg’s skills,” said Lee Daniels of Hulamin.

Some of the areas of skills shortages expected to be addressed in the future are:

• Engineering

• Tool-making

• Fitters and turners

• Boilermakers

• Millwrights

• Electricians.

kavith@witness.co.za