Sharika Regchand
News Editor
2 minute read
16 Apr 2021
06:16

Pietermaritzburg judge Gorven selected as candidate for Supreme Court position

Sharika Regchand

Pietermaritzburg High Court Judge Trevor Gorven (pictured) has been selected as a candidate for a position at the Supreme Court of Appeal, the Judicial Service Commission (JSC) announced on Thursday.

Pietermaritzburg High Court Judge Trevor Gorven has been selected as a candidate for a position at the Supreme Court of Appeal, the Judicial Service Commission (JSC) announced on Thursday.

There are five vacancies at the SCA and five candidates have been selected.

The list of recommended candidates, which also includes Judge Zeenat Carelse, Judge Wendy Hughes, Judge Nolwazi Mabindla-Boqwana and Judge Selewe Mothle will be sent to President Cyril Ramaphosa who will make a final decision on who to appoint.

Gorven was appointed as a judge in 2008. He is married to Melanie and the couple have two daughters.

Admission as advocate
Gorven was admitted as an advocate on August 6, 1979 and appointed senior counsel on February 23, 2006.

After matriculating from Northlands Boys’ High School in 1971, he studied for his BA and LLB degrees at the University of Natal’s Durban and Pietermaritzburg campuses.

He also did courses in theology in the United Kingdom and through the University of South Africa and obtained certificates in labour law and constitutional litigation through the University of KwaZulu-Natal

Gorven was admitted as an advocate on August 6, 1979 and appointed senior counsel on February 23, 2006.

His practice was primarily concerned with civil litigation.

He was a member of the Pietermaritzburg branch of the Society of Advocates of KwaZulu-Natal since December 1988, as well as a member of the National Democratic Lawyers (Nadel), Pietermaritzburg branch.

Challenging Jiba

The law required that all racketeering charges had to be signed off by then acting National Director of Public Prosecutions Nomgcobo Jiba. However, Booysen challenged this.

Judge Gorven declared the decision to prosecute former Hawks boss, Major-General Johan Booysen, irrational.

This was after Booysen and other officers were accused of operating a “Cato Manor death squad”, and in 2012 were arrested and charged with 116 crimes, including racketeering, murder and attempted murder.

The law required that all racketeering charges had to be signed off by then acting National Director of Public Prosecutions Nomgcobo Jiba.

However, Booysen challenged this and in 2014, Gorven set aside Jiba’s authorisation, ruling that there was no evidence to warrant it.