Gerard Johnson
2 minute read
21 Jun 2022
06:02

Letters | Economic sabotage in SA

Gerard Johnson

The article dated June 17 refers. Over the past week and months, we have seen our country’s economy under constant pressure and hit by deliberate sabotage.

OPINION:


The article dated June 17 refers. Over the past week and months, we have seen our country’s economy under constant pressure and hit by deliberate sabotage.

Forget the devastating impact of Covid-19. Forget the constant “load shedding”. Forget the violent looting and destruction of businesses that happened last July. Now we have the national roads being blocked by criminal syndicates masquerading as truck driver forums. According to the latest information, approximately R300 million was lost by the recent blockade of the N3. This comes hot on the heels of the devastating floods that severely impacted the Durban port and supply chain.

Now we have the national roads being blocked by criminal syndicates masquerading as truck driver forums. According to the latest information, approximately R300 million was lost by the recent blockade of the N3.
Gerard Johnson

It seems the new norm in SA, if you don’t get what you want, is to resort to violence and looting. We see this with service-delivery protests and university protests, and we are now seeing that there may be some individuals who deliberately sabotage our power grid and water supply. Questions for government: How long are you going to sit back and only “condemn” these actions?

Which overseas investors would consider investing in such a lawless country?

The ATM, EFF and Cosatu complain about the high unemployment rate, but this deliberate sabotage will only increase unemployment, Talk about cutting off your own nose to spite your face.

GERARD JOHNSON

Pietermaritzburg

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