Babies & ToddlersKids

Why it’s important to get your baby vaccinated

Vaccinations not only protect your child from deadly diseases, but they also keep other children safe by eliminating or significantly decreasing dangerous illnesses that used to spread from child to child. A vaccine is a dead, or weakened version, or part of the germ that causes the disease in question. When children are exposed to …

Vaccinations not only protect your child from deadly diseases, but they also keep other children safe by eliminating or significantly decreasing dangerous illnesses that used to spread from child to child.

A vaccine is a dead, or weakened version, or part of the germ that causes the disease in question. When children are exposed to a disease in vaccine form, their immune system, which is the body’s germ-fighting machine, can build up antibodies that protect them from contracting the disease if and when they are exposed to the actual disease. 

When you leave the hospital after delivering your baby, you will be given an immunisation card. This card schedules when your baby should visit the clinic for their immunisations. Most of your child’s vaccinations are completed between birth and six years. During clinic visits, a nurse will track your baby’s development and ensure their development is on track. You mustn’t miss these appointments. If you can’t get your baby to a clinic, most pharmacies can vaccinate your baby at a minimal fee. There is no excuse for not getting your baby vaccinated. Remember that when you apply for your child to start school, their immunisation card will be needed as part of the acceptance requirements. 

Immunisation is life-saving

Vaccinating your baby eliminates the threat of your tot developing severe and sometimes fatal diseases such as poliovirus, hepatitis B, pneumococcal disease, maternal and neonatal tetanus, and measles.

Vaccinations are safe

As a parent, you may have certain reservations about vaccines but rest assured that the benefits of vaccines far outweigh any discomfort your baby may experience. Common side effects of immunizations include swelling at the site of the injection, soreness, and fever. Discuss these side effects with your doctor and ask what symptoms deserve an office call.

Immunisation makes financial sense

Treating life-threatening diseases may prove costly. Rather get your child immunised so that they do not get to a point where they need an expensive intervention that could have been prevented in the first place. It’s a vital investment in your family’s long-term health. 

Handy tips when taking your child for vaccinations

  • When you’re anxious, your baby tends to be more nervous as well and may cry more than usual. Stay calm and be strong during the appointment.
  • Distract your little one while he’s getting his shots because once they concentrate on what is happening around them, they may cry hysterically. Pull some funny faces, sing a familiar song to your little one, take a mobile with which you can hang above him, or shake a rattle to distract him.
  • With older children, asking them to close their eyes and talk about their favourite cartoon characters can work wonders.
  • If you’re breastfeeding, feed your little one while he’s getting his shots, or place him onto your breast immediately after he gets his vaccinations – this is comforting for both mom and baby.
  • Rub the area which has been vaccinated – it usually is comforting to your little one.
  • Don’t administer pain and fever medication directly after the vaccination. Rather wait and see if your baby develops a fever of 38 degrees or more before administering the medication.
  • Although your little one may cry a little bit, he’ll be very forgiving once you distract him with kisses and cuddles.

 

 

 
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