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State to pay up after Shaka’s Head baby loses arm

Mpanza said Kuyakhaya, who will be turning three this year, is growing up fast and that while he has learnt how to function with one arm, he should never have had to.

Justice has been served for a Shaka’s Head mother whose baby lost an arm due to negligence at the hands of General Gizenga Mpanza Hospital staff in KwaDuuza in 2017.

Phindile Mpanza successfully sued the hospital and department of health because her baby Kuyakhaya’s arm had to be amputated after a drip was apparently inserted incorrectly, which led to complications.

Mpanza gave birth by Caesarean section on February 6, 2017.

Both mother and child were kept in hospital for a week because Kuyakhanya’s blood sugar was low.

“A drip was inserted into his arm. After a couple of days, I realised that my baby’s arm was becoming cold and swollen and was turning purple,” said Mpanza.

She reported the problem to a nurse but she was told she must wait for a doctor.

The child was distressed and clearly in pain but nothing was done to help him.

Eventually, the drip was removed but the baby’s condition did not improve.

At 1am on February 14, 2017, mother and baby were transferred to Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital but it was already too late to save Kuyakhanya’s arm.

After the story was published in The North Coast Courier Mpanza received a call from an Umhlanga law firm, which promised to help her claim from the state.

Mpanza’s attorney, Shaheel Singh of Umhlanga law firm PG Naidoo and Associates said the court ruled in favour of Mpanza last November.

“The matter shall now proceed on the issue of how she will be compensated and she has filed and served her medical reports in this regard. She is in the process of complying with the practice directives of the high court and will thereafter seek a trial date. The state is yet to make an offer,” said Singh.

Mpanza said Kuyakhaya, who will be turning three this year, is growing up fast and that while he has learnt how to function with one arm, he should never have had to.

“He keeps on asking me what happened to his arm and I find it very hard to explain it to him, because he is still young.”

She said that while she needed the money to raise her disabled child it would never be enough to compensate for the pain they both still go through.

“I believe that the state should provide education for him and when he grows up employ him because I am quite sure it will be hard for him to get a decent job,” she said.

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