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Gauteng Health MEC commemorates AIDS Day in Sebokeng

"Ninety-five percent of all people diagnosed with HIV infection must receive continuous ARV therapy and a further 95% of all people receiving ARVS must receive the suppression by 2025," said Mayor Maloka.

SEBOKENG – Gauteng Health MEC Nomantu Nkomo-Ralehoko commemorated World Aids Day at the Saul Tsotetsi Sports Complex in Sebokeng on Friday, December 01.

Nkomo-Ralehoko was flanked by Acting Premier of Gauteng Lebogang Maile, MEC Tasneem Motara, Emfuleni Mayor Sipho Radebe, Sedibeng Mayor Lerato Maloka, and the Gauteng AIDS Council.

The event was commemorated under the theme “let communities lead”.

Giving her speech and introducing the Acting Premier, Nkomo-Ralehoko said “We gather here in Sebokeng not just as a community, but as a united front in the global fight against HIV/AIDS. This day, observed annually on December 1st, is a vital opportunity for us to reflect on the progress we’ve made, confront the challenges that lie ahead, and reaffirm our commitment to eradicating this epidemic”.

“We remember and honour those we have lost to this disease, a solemn reminder of why our fight is so crucial. Their memories fuel our determination to prevent new infections, support those living with HIV, and ultimately find a cure. We stand in solidarity with the millions around the world affected by HIV/AIDS, acknowledging the impact this virus has had on communities, families, and individuals,” she said.

A survey released by the  Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) recently, shows that 7.8 million people in South Africa are living with HIV/AIDS.

The survey also shows that HIV prevalence was nearly twice as high among women (20%) compared to men (12%). By race, HIV prevalence was the highest among black Africans (20%), followed by Coloureds (5%), and lowest among Whites and Indian/Asian people (1% each).

Maloka said HIV/AIDS is not just a medical problem.

“The circle of violence contributes significantly to the spread of HIV. AIDS and related diseases are not just medical problems, they are deeply rooted in societal behavior, particularly on how women and young girls are perceived and treated,” she said.

Maloka says 95% of people living with HIV must achieve viral suppression by 2025.

“Ninety-five percent of all people diagnosed with HIV infection must receive continuous ARV therapy and a further 95% of all people receiving ARVS must receive the suppression by 2025,” said Maloka.

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