News

Kerry Bird
2 minute read
26 Aug 2020
1:58 pm

Horse left for dead on side of road in Bethal

Kerry Bird

The horse was diagnosed with Monday Morning Disease and due to the extent of internal damage and injuries, the animal did not survive.

Bethal SPCA inspector with Freddie who was left for dead in Tsibitsa Sibanyoni Street on Thursday, 20 August. Image: Ridge Times.

A horse was left for dead on the side of the road in Bethel, Mpumalanga, eventually dying on Sunday, 22 August, from the tremendous trauma that had been inflicted on him.

Bethal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) inspector Laurna Coetzer was called to attend to an injured and abandon horse in Tsibitsa Sibanyoni Street on Thursday, 20 August.

Coetzer said she had received a tip-off of children riding three horses, but upon investigating she only found the one horse.

“They had ridden the horse and left him for dead,” said Coetzer.

The horse that had since been named Freddie was weak to the point where he could not get up. The horse had been ridden so badly that it could no longer move.

An extreme amount of saltpetre was visible on his body.

The animal was given concentrated food and electrolyte water, and then later transported to a place of safety where he could be taken care of.

A veterinarian examined him and prescribed the necessary treatment. A close eye was kept on him for two days.

Freddie’s caregiver said the horse’s body went into continuous spasms the entire time. He had to be fed and given water by hand because he was too weak to lift his head.

“His body and organs were just too weak to recover,” she said.

Freddie was diagnosed with Monday Morning Disease and due to the extent of internal damage and injuries, the animal did not survive.

“We have a huge problem of stock theft in this area. These horses are stolen and used by dwellers and youngsters who stay near or in townships. They abandon the animals when they can’t use them anymore.”

Coetzer said there were also signs on the horses’ backs that indicate when the animals have abused from a young age.

“The dent in their backs is proof of it.”

Animal cruelty is a criminal offence according to the Animal Cruelty Act 71 of 1962. One can get prosecuted and receive a fine and/or prison time.

If you know of anyone or suspect any animal cruelty, report it to the nearest SPCA or NSPCA at 011 907 3590.

The Bethal SPCA contact numbers are 017 647 5360 or 066 397 1630 during office hours. The emergency number is 072 573 3122.

This article first appeared on Ridge Times and was republished with permission.

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