Hein Kaiser
Journalist
3 minute read
7 Dec 2021
4:37 pm

After Covid-19, impotence could be a reality for many men

Hein Kaiser

Erectile dysfunction may be a love-life hazard, as an emerging Covid-19 after-effect in male patients seems to be impotence.

One of the after-effects of Covid is said to be impotence. Picture Supplied.

If you don’t want to become reliant on erectile-aid to get it up, getting vaccinated against Covid-19 may be one of the 21st century’s best sexual aids.

As more is becoming known about the virus and its side-effects, a man’s ability to rise to the occasion can be severely hampered after contracting the disease. And this may damage any hope of getting nookie for quite some time, if not permanently. Impotence is a real risk.

Mike van Wyk, chief executive of Medicare24, said there was mounting evidence that the impact of the disease affects people on multiple levels, whether it’s after-Covid short term memory loss, hearing impairment or losing a measure of taste and smell permanently.

“It’s also unfortunately got a very negative effect on erections given its vascular dependency on a surge of blood in order to get an erection.”

Van Wyk added that erectile dysfunction or impotence is normally a litmus for a man’s state of wellness, but Covid-19 can either exacerbate existing conditions, too, or introduce an extended period of flaccidity.

Reports have also been published about the testicular damage that an infection can cause. While a lot of research is presently underway to determine the extent or permanency of damage, enough evidence has been gathered to indicate that infertility may be an unwanted after-Covid side effect.

“This could be what is referred to as another long-haul effect of the virus,” said van Wyk, “There is so little known about the virus that new data becomes available daily and the testes are set to join other organs like the lungs, heart and blood clotting as collateral damage of infection.”

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Erectile dysfunction is also a predicator of heart disease and the damage to the heart muscle is a known side effect of the coronavirus.

Van Wyk said: “The math is uncomplicated. There is just no denying that vaccination is the only way to go.”

Van Wyk added that men invested a substantial measure of their self-esteem in their members and performance ability in the bedroom.

“The psychological damage that Covid can cause can be irreversible, too. Imagine getting a bout of severe infection, thoughts of death and a sustained rush of emotions pulse through your heart and mind daily.

“Then you recover, and your joy of survival is muted because you cannot get it up, not even if an entire harem presents themselves to you for the taking. You’re impotent. That can crush a man, and this on top of the life and death considerations while he was sick.”

Van Wyk noted that anti-vaxxers must be ignored.

“We had an anti-vaxxer barge into one of our clinics, taking pictures, spreading negativity and demanding to be heard. He was adamant that there was an alternative point of view, a conspiracy theory point of view, to the generally accepted science. But I wonder how he would feel if he had to get ill, badly sick, and recover only to find that the shed’s there but the power tools are missing.”

Vaccine hesitant urban legends also now include nonsensical notions that the jab injects the mark of the Revelation’s beast, that vaccines kill people and that it gives you Covid, gratis.

Van Wyk is concerned as experts already warn that South Africa is entering its fourth wave.

“I have heard stories that range from the ridiculous to utterly stupid. The evidence is there for all to see and for men, it’s not just about getting ill or not, even an A-symptomatic case can leave you hanging less than half mast, potentially forever.”