Charl Bosch
Online Motoring Reporter
2 minute read
9 Dec 2020
8:30 am

Forbidden tremble: Ford sends Tremor into facelift F-150

Charl Bosch

Step below the iconic Raptor remains a no-no for South Africa.

Ford F-150 Tremor

With the Tremor designation already featuring on the Ranger and Super Duty, Ford has reintroduced the moniker to the updated F-150 in North America as a step below the Raptor.

Building on the revisions applied to the facelift model introduced in June, the Tremor, apart from the off-road focused FX4 it slots-in above, receives a blacked-out grille as well as side steps said to have come from the Raptor, a tweaked bonnet, Active Orange accents, dual exhaust outlets, Tremor badging on the tailgate, tow hooks and 18-inch matte alloy wheels wrapped in 33-inch General Grabber all-terrain tyres.

Even more subtle is the interior which gets Active Orange stitching on the dashboard, seats, instrument cluster, door panels and centre console. Standard specification, aside from the usual range of features, includes a surround view camera system, six auxiliary power outlets, Trail Turn Assist, Hill Descent Control and seven driving modes; Eco, Normal, Slippery, Two/Haul, Snow/Sand, Mud/Ruts, Sport and a bespoke Rock Crawl setting.

The biggest changes have taken place underneath the skin though where apart from the tyres, Ford has fitted the Tremor with locking front and rear differentials, with the option of upgrading to a Torsen limited slip unit. Like the Raptor, the Tremor boasts a torque-on-demand transfer case while also featuring model specific mono-tube shock absorbers utilising a twin-tube design at the front and single at the rear.

Only offered in double cab or Super Crew bodystyle, the Tremor will only be available with the twin-turbocharged 3.5 EcoBoost V6 whose 294kW/678Nm is delivered to all four wheels via the now ubiquitous General Motors co-developed ten-speed automatic gearbox.

Going on sale soon, pricing for the Tremor has not yet been announced but as before, and despite intensified pressure from notably Australia, it will remain left-hand-drive for the foreseeable future.

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