Lifestyle

Celebrate World Sleep Day on March 17

The day is meant to be a celebration of sleep as well as a call to action on important sleep-related issues such as medicine, education, social aspects, and driving.

The World Sleep Society has hosted World Sleep Day on March 17 since 2008. The day is meant to be a celebration of sleep as well as a call to action on important sleep-related issues such as medicine, education, social aspects, and driving. The World Sleep Society organises it (based in the USA). This is a global awareness day with a series of events aimed at reducing the societal burden of sleep problems through better prevention and management of sleep disorders.

Also read: Why sleep quality is important during exams

World Sleep Day has gotten a lot of attention from the media and celebrities all over the world. World Sleep Day has been observed in over 88 countries worldwide. For the past three years, the hashtag #WorldSleepDay has been a trending topic on Twitter.
Joni Peddie, executive coach and strategic facilitator, is honoured to be a part of this international scale of collaboration, leadership, scientific research, and sleep health awareness.

Also read: How to know if you are getting enough sleep

“Given the state of our South African economy, with the country now greylisted, Eskom problems, high-interest rates, and general turbulence… no one Joni speaks to is not stressed, overwhelmed, and struggling to sleep! This ranges from corporate CEOs to one-person shoe repair shops!”

A few fun facts

· Sleep has a major impact on our health and quality of life. We need between seven and nine hours of good sleep every night for our body and brain to rest.

· It’s not all about quantity, it is also about quality, in other words, restorative sleep. This kind of deep, refreshing sleep is the single most effective thing you can do for your overall health: your body and brain health.

· Good-quality sleep helps you think clearly and objectively, and make good daily decisions.

· Humans are emotional beings and we often forget that ‘emotions are contagious’. Good sleep helps you understand, manage and navigate your emotions.

· Less than seven hours a night, and our ability to concentrate may suffer, our immune system may weaken, and we end up eating more food– and often more unhealthy food – than we need to.

· Getting too little sleep alters the balance of our hormones. This can also lead us to eat more food and gain weight. That’s why getting enough sleep can help you to resist that extra portion of tempting food.

· One scientific study has shown that short-sleepers – people who sleep less than seven hours a day – tend to eat MORE, about 1 255 kJ (300 calories) more every day, than people who get enough sleep. This is because they are drawn to foods with higher levels of saturated fat, like fast food, cheese, and processed meats. Over a long period, this daily increase is enough to raise the risk of obesity.

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