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Knocking a nail in the unemployment coffin

He started in the trade as a young boy aged between 14 to 15 years old and remembers creating speakers from tomato box planks and selling them to friends to make pocket money.

When William Shibambo started learning about carpentry, he didn’t anticipate that he would be the one in future to keep his brothers and peers from crime and unemployment with his own business.

Shibambo, who manufactures his own furniture, didn’t just make it to the professional level he is now on. He started out working for Urban Design in Aereton for four years before going on to work for Lloyd’s Lounge and Joinery for another four years.

Shibambo said, “It has taken pure dedication and passion for me to still be doing the same trade after eleven years. It has paid off because now, in the same manner, that other people wake up to go and work, I wake up to work for myself.”



Shibambo from Diepkloof Zone Two continued working and went on to work for two years at the SABC, where he did the upholstery for Motsweding FM and Radio 2000 FM under a construction company called Pro Silver.

His journey as an employee came to an end when he figured out that owning his machinery and working for himself would make life better.

Shibambo said, “Because of my trade and my talent, I can maintain two kids and carpentry has kept us from the streets because you know the current youth tends to be unruly. This industry has helped keep me on the straight and narrow.”



Shibambo has employed his brother William and said, “I have been good because I used to be unemployed with no plan, but working here has been helping me survive and maintain my dignity.”

He started in the trade as a young boy aged between 14 to 15 years old and remembers creating speakers from tomato box planks and selling them to friends to make pocket money.

This showed him the potential his gifts could have for him in the future. To make sure he didn’t miss the mark, his parents took him to a technical school in Mpumalanga and by then he already knew that he would make things work.

Shibambo said, “If you are talented and you know it, be assured that if you work hard enough with your hands, you can make it”.

William can manufacture anything from couches to built-in cupboards.




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