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By Editorial staff

Journalist


Expats’ skills can help our economy grow

Vilifying those who leave will not help our country heal.


At the Rugby World Cup quarterfinal between the Springboks and France in Paris on Sunday, many non-South Africans were struck by the passion and unity of our fans. Some had travelled from South Africa to be there… but probably even more members of the green-and-gold army came from Europe and the UK, where they have been living as expats. There are probably those who will remark that, now that these people have left – many apparently for good – then we must say good riddance. ALSO READ: Sars resets expats tax residency with shifted goalposts   Once you turn your…

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At the Rugby World Cup quarterfinal between the Springboks and France in Paris on Sunday, many non-South Africans were struck by the passion and unity of our fans.

Some had travelled from South Africa to be there… but probably even more members of the green-and-gold army came from Europe and the UK, where they have been living as expats. There are probably those who will remark that, now that these people have left – many apparently for good – then we must say good riddance.

ALSO READ: Sars resets expats tax residency with shifted goalposts  

Once you turn your back on your land of birth, there can be no turning back. You are no longer one of us, the naysayers would argue… so don the colours of your adopted home.

The fact that many South Africans, as we report today, cannot sever the links to their homeland, shows not only that our nation has a powerful emotional pull – but that many of them feel they were forced out.

Again, the argument would be that many whites left because they could not live under a black government and, while that would be true for some, it would not be true for all.

ALSO READ: Expats in these three island locations are easy targets for Sars

Many would have left through genuine concerns for security or for a future for their families in a country collapsing economically.

Those concerns are, increasingly, seeing the diaspora slowly changing colour as more and more non-whites – professionals particularly – come to believe they don’t have a future in South Africa.

And, once you get past the politics of hate, that should concern not only our government, but it should also worry any person who wants to see this country thrive.

ALSO READ: Excessive red tape preventing expats from returning to SA

Many of these people have the skills which can help our economy grow and their loss is, and will be in future, keenly felt.

Vilifying those who leave will not help our country heal.

Read more on these topics

economy Skills Shortage South African economy

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