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By Editorial staff

Journalist


The struggle to stick to the New Year’s plan

Sadly, according to statistics, more than half of new year resolutions usually fail.


It is easy – and usually tempting – to have some sort of new year resolutions with the beginning of every new year and, according to clinical psychologist Professor Erica Munnik, it is actually a good thing to have them.

But here’s the rub, the resolutions must be “specific, obtainable, realistic and timely”, she advises.

While we tend to gravitate towards another psychologist, Markus van der Merwe, who says he does not believe in setting new year resolutions, we advise that, if you still do, take a look at the SA College of Applied Psychology’s 10 steps to successful new year’s resolutions.

ALSO READ: How to keep those New Year’s resolutions

Among others, they advise that if you have a plan, be realistic and break down the resolutions into manageable segments.

Whether, like Van der Merwe, you try to better yourself daily or, like Munnik, believe resolutions are “a way for individuals to be more self-efficient and to empower themselves”, the idea is that you must constantly work on improving your circumstances and lead a better life.

Sadly, according to statistics, more than half of new year resolutions usually fail.

Which reminds us of Benjamin Franklin’s famous quote: “By failing to plan, you are preparing to fail.”

So, make sure you have a plan.

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