Siyanda Ndlovu
Digital Journalist
1 minute read
9 Apr 2021
2:18 pm

MUT protests on hold after meeting between SRC and authorities

Siyanda Ndlovu

The university was hit with a double blow as workers have embarked on a strike demanding an 8% salary increase against the institution’s offer of 3.3%. 

Students protest, one armed with a slingshot, for increased government funding for tertiary education at Mangosuthu University of Technology (MUT) in Durban. Picture: Gallo Images.

Protests at the Mangosuthu University of Technology (MUT) have been temporarily suspended.

This was announced by the EFF Student Command (EFFSC) SRC president on Friday following a meeting between the SRC, university management, the KwaZulu-Natal education department, unions Nehawu and officials from the office of the Premier.

Central to students’ demands is resolving the impasse over funding and registration.

The university was hit with a double blow as workers have also embarked on a strike demanding an 8% salary increase against the institution’s offer of 3.3%.

The SRC has called on the university to allow eligible students to have historical debts written off and to be allowed to register.

This is despite the university’s acting deputy vice-chancellor, Manyani Makuwa, saying they did not have the funds to write of debt.

SRC president Mthokozisi Gumede told The Citizen that protests have been temporarily suspended following the meeting between the MEC, university and SRC.

“We are giving them until Monday to address the students’ demands,” said Gumede.

“We will be monitoring the progress and if by Monday there is still no progress we will be left with no choice but to go back to protesting.”

ALSO READ: MUT students vow to continue protests over registration fees, historical debt

Gumede said students were also experiencing problems with accommodation, along with funding-related issues like the disbursement of laptops.

For its part, the university said some of the issues raised by students fell outside its control and institutions like the National Student Financial Aid Scheme were better positioned to respond.

Acting deputy vice-chancellor Manyani Makua said they were exploring how they could better respond to issues raised by students ahead of the commencement of classes.

Siyanda Ndlovu