Narissa Subramoney
Copy rewriter
1 minute read
3 Jun 2022
7:45 am

Checkers uses recycled material to package rotisserie chicken and other foods

Narissa Subramoney

This is part of Checker’s ongoing commitment to environmental sustainability.

In future, all of Checkers in-house produced food from the deli and bakery will use recycled materials. Picture: Supplied.

The Shoprite Group (Checkers) has announced that it used 68 tons of unrecyclable material from landfills to make packaging for its in-house produced foods, starting with rotisserie chicken boxes.

The retailer is going forging ahead with its recycled packaging transition, and soon all paper and carton board packaging used at in-store deli’s, bakeries and fresh fish sections will be 100% responsibly sourced.

Other efforts to promote recycling include private label Crystal Valley Fresh Milk’s bottle cap colour changing from blue and red to white, which enables recyclers to eliminate downcycling into darker cap colours like black.

In the next two months, PET Thermoform plastic sandwich punnets will be replaced with a Kraft carton sandwich wedge which has a small window, for easy removal before recycling.

The Shoprite Group is currently recycling large volumes of material per hour through its reverse logistics operations.

This included:

  • Plastic: 4 653 tons per year = 531 kgs per hour or 0.5 tons per hour
  • Cardboard: 40 327 tons per year = 4 604 kgs per hour or 4.6 tons per hour

Checkers is now the first South African retailer to replace its rotisserie chicken packaging with fully recyclable, responsibly sourced cardboard boxes.

“This will prevent 68 tons of non-recycled multi-layer laminated material from being landfilled every year,” said the retail giant in a statement.

“This is part of Checker’s ongoing commitment to environmental sustainability as we continue to make changes that are better for our planet.”

To promote the circular economy, the Group has ensured that 100% of its own-brand packaging is reusable, recyclable and compostable and that it contains on average 30% recycled material content by 2025.

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