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By Editorial staff

Journalist


Cholera remains a global threat

After all the good work in the fight against this bacterial disease, we can’t afford to drop our guard.


The World Health Organisation’s (WHO) warning at the weekend that there is a “worrying upsurge” in cholera outbreaks globally is major cause for concern. After a lengthy period of decline, according to the United Nations agency, more and more cases of cholera are being reported. From January to the end of last month, 26 countries have reported cholera outbreaks. They noted that between 2017 and 2021, less than 20 nations reported outbreaks per year. Just yesterday, it was reported at least seven people in Haiti have died from the disease. About 10 000 people died in the wake of Haiti’s…

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The World Health Organisation’s (WHO) warning at the weekend that there is a “worrying upsurge” in cholera outbreaks globally is major cause for concern.

After a lengthy period of decline, according to the United Nations agency, more and more cases of cholera are being reported. From January to the end of last month, 26 countries have reported cholera outbreaks.

They noted that between 2017 and 2021, less than 20 nations reported outbreaks per year. Just yesterday, it was reported at least seven people in Haiti have died from the disease. About 10 000 people died in the wake of Haiti’s 2010 earthquake.

ALSO READ: Syria cholera outbreak at risk of spreading – WHO

Philippe Barboza, the WHO’s team lead on cholera and epidemic diarrhoeal diseases, said: “Not only do we have more outbreaks, but the outbreaks themselves are larger and more deadly.”

He added: “Extreme climate events like floods, cyclones and droughts further reduce the access to clean water and create an ideal environment for cholera to thrive. As the impacts of climate change intensify, we can expect the situation to worsen unless we act now to boost cholera prevention.”

Although it is fatal if not treated immediately, oral rehydration and antibiotics can treat more severe cases. After all the good work in the fight against this bacterial disease, we can’t afford to drop our guard.

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Cholera World Health Organization (WHO)

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