Vhahangwele Nemakonde
Digital Journalist
2 minute read
2 Nov 2021
10:08 pm

Guests evacuated following fire at Kruger Park

Vhahangwele Nemakonde

Last Sunday, the park warned tourists of a 'large fire' in Tshokwane and said the hot temperatures and wind speed were making it impossible for firefighters to control the blaze at the time.

Picture: Kruger Park/Twitter

Guests have been evacuated following a fire in the central area of the Kruger National Park on Tuesday.

“Guests have been evacuated from Tamboti and Kingfisherspruit Ranger Post as a precaution. Fire fighting teams are on the scene,” said Kruger National Park in a statement.

This is the second fire in a week. Last Sunday, the park warned tourists of a “large fire” in Tshokwane and said the hot temperatures and wind speed were making it impossible for firefighters to control the blaze at the time.

“The cause of the fire is unknown. The fire is currently being monitored as there have not been any damage to infrastructure except for a ranger’s tent which has been destroyed. No Injuries have been reported. Other sections are on standby to assist should the need arise. All are urged to remain calm and vigilant,” said the park at the time.

Earlier this year, the park said it was anticipating the winter fire season which usually takes place between June and October. With only two days into November, the park could be experiencing what it called a “common” and “natural” occurrence in the Tropical Grassland, which is dependent on fires to “keep the ecosystem functioning in a healthy manner”.

“Savanna plant species have evolved with fires and some even rely on and are shaped by regular burning of the veld. Research has shown that regardless of the fire management strategy (namely active use of fire as veld management tool or active fire suppression), fires will burn in KNP as long as there is enough grass to burn. This is because fires are primarily driven by how much grass is available (also known as fuel load). Fuel load is dependent on how much rainfall fell in the preceding growing season. KNP has experienced an exceptionally wet growing season this past summer, and the veld has responded by producing high fuel loads. We are therefore anticipating a lot more fires this winter.”


“A large proportion of this will be controlled burns conducted by our Rangers; but it is likely that we will also have unscheduled fires during the course of the year and these will be managed as they occur,” said the park at the time.