2 minute read
14 Aug 2013
5:00 am

Drumming up passion

The annual SA Tattoo returns to Montecasino for just six performances from September 5–8. A tattoo is an event that exhibits a country's cultures through music and dance; strength of identity and unity for a common cause.

Picture: Sherene Hustler.

From the mighty hail of the drum major to the toe tapping of the Highland dancers and the traditional sounds of the massed pipes and drums, this year’s programme combines the finest local and international talents.

Now in its fifth year, the SA Tattoo has grown in stature and popularity. More than 90 000 people have enjoyed the multi-cultural and multi-national performances that bring diverse mass entertainment to Montecasino year after year. The organisers of the event are delighted to announce the return of the iconic Top Secret Drum Corps from Switzerland who pre-viously performed at the 2008 Tattoo to critical acclaim.

Having developed rock star status in Europe, this group of precision drummers turn drumming into an entertainment art form. Renowned beyond the world of drumming and tattoo organisations, their unique blend of American, Scottish and Basel styles has made the Corps musicians a top international act that has won the hearts of audiences for more than 20 years.

“As the Top Secret Drum Corps has limited their performances to only a few select venues, we regard their participation at this year’s Tattoo as a major coup for South Africa”, says Simon Carter, executive producer of SA Tattoo.

Featuring sensational international acts from France and Switzerland, the show’s producers are particularly pleased that iconic local rock band Just Jinger (pictured) is the headliner for the show. Having toured internationally with megastars U2, Counting Crows and Def Leppard and with album sales exceeding a quarter of a million plus two albums with double platinum status, Just Jinjer is one of this country’s biggest rock exports.

The mix of Tattoo acts includes drum majorettes, a local massed choir, the Johannesburg Youth Orchestra, the SAPS Tshwane Band, the National Ceremonial Guard Band and the Code Red Drum Corps. There’s no sound quite like 180 pipers and drummers playing in unison under an African sky to render the audience speechless.