Jaco Van Der Merwe

Compiled by Jaco Van Der Merwe

Head of Motoring


Bulletproofing your Land Rover Defender will set you back R782k

For protection against assault rifles and hand grenades, you'll need to cough up R1.7 million.


If you want to take the defences of your Land Rover Defender to the next level, Armormax has the perfect solution.

The Randburg-based vehicle armourer, which is an approved partner of Jaguar Land Rover, offers two levels of bulletproofing for the popular Defender. All three chassis versions of the Defender, the 90, 110 and 130, can be converted to either of these levels.

Discretion is key for Armormax and as such, these conversions are not discernible to the naked eye from the outside and barely noticeable from inside barring a few key elements such as a blanked-off, armoured but still operable sunroof and rear windows that no longer open.

Fit and finish is comparable to that of a standard factory Land Rover Defender and vehicle dynamics are largely unaffected.

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B4 or B6 for Land Rover Defender?

B4 protection defeats the threats of all handguns which are popular in most attacks because of the ease with which they can be concealed.

The B4 armouring entails all glass being replaced with ballistic glass with steel rebated edges, all doors and panels protected with lightweight synthetic armour, armoured A, B and C pillars using lightweight synthetic armour, entire roof and sunroof armoured using lightweight synthetic armour, run-flat tyre system and PTT intercom system.

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This Land Rover Defender conversion takes 15 to 20 working days to complete and adds 200 kg to the Defender model’s overall weight. It costs R782 000 to install.

B6 protection defeats the threats of commonly used assault rifles, such as the AK47 and R5 and can withstand grenade attacks.

The kitchen sink

The B6 armouring includes all glass replaced with ballistic glass with steel rebated edges, all doors protected with lightweight synthetic armour, armoured A, B and C pillars using ballistic steel, entire roof and sunroof armoured using lightweight synthetic armour.

Firewall and crucial body shell areas are armoured with ballistic steel, the floor is armoured with lightweight synthetic armour, front fenders is armoured with ballistic steel, the fuel cell protected with Armorcote self-sealing treatment and the battery and ECU protected with lightweight synthetic armour. It also includes a run-flat tyre system and PTT intercom system.

The Land Rover Defender’s third row of seats and cargo area are not compromised by the B6 option where this would normally be the case with the installation of a rear bulkhead.

The B6 conversion takes 55 to 60 working days and adds 600 kg to the car’s overall weight. It costs R1 728 000.

ALSO READ: Playful Land Rover Defender 90 back with a bang

‘No different to standard car’

“We were massively excited to take on the Defender project as we really felt it would offer armoured car owners’ great versatility and the safety they are looking for,” says Armormax sales and marketing manager Michael Broom.

“I can personally attest to it feeling no different to the standard car, other than the obvious peace of mind it brings you on South African roads.”

A B4 Land Rover Defender will soon be available to experience at the Jaguar Land Rover Experience Centre upon special request by dealer customers.

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