Kaunda Selisho
Lifestyle Journalist
3 minute read
29 Jun 2021
11:43 am

Lillian Dube reminds us to ‘suck those titties’ to detect cancer

Kaunda Selisho

Lillian Dube said she wasn't being crass but genuinely believes in the efficacy of the practice to detect cancer.

Breast cancer awareness activist Lillian Dube believes in the efficacy of sexual partners sucking their lover's breasts to detect lumps in a breast which may be a sign of cancer. Picture: Instagram

Veteran South African actress and cancer awareness activist Lillian Dube has issued her annual reminder to “suck those titties”.

“When I talk, I always say ‘suck those titties’ and I mean it because they have to be sucked. Not to cure cancer but to detect,” Dube said.

Speaking at the launch of this year’s Avon and Justine iThemba Walkathon, Dube said she wasn’t being crass but because she genuinely believes in the efficacy of the practice to detect lumps in a breast which may be a sign of cancer.

“It was 2007 when I was diagnosed with breast cancer and I started talking to God, bribing him, to say ‘if you save me, I am going to create awareness,'” she told event MC Zikhona Sodlaka.

Dube says she found her own lump during her time on SABC1 drama Soul City in which she played the character of Sister Bettina for years.

It was through her activism and education work linked to the character that she did her own breast self-examination and found the lump, which eventually turned out to be a tumour.

“I can’t impress on you enough to suck those titties,” she repeated, much to the chagrin of Sodlaka.

Dube first trended for the statement back in 2018 when she asked SABC Sport’s Thomas Mlambo what he sucks after he burst into laughter in reaction to what she had to say.

Lillian Dube and Sodlaka are among those who will be present at the 16th annual charity event aimed at raising awareness and funds for breast cancer.

This year’s iThemba Walkathon will also be a virtual affair due to Covid-19 restrictions and participants are encouraged to walk in small groups in their local neighbourhood wherever in the country they may be.

“The third wave of the Covid-19 pandemic is upon us and we need to painstakingly heed the health and safety protocols aimed at curbing the further transmission of the virus,” Avon Justine Turkey, Middle East & Africa CEO Mafahle Mareletse said.

“It is equally important that we should also keep the momentum in the fight against breast cancer by supporting frontline organisations and people infected and affected by breast cancer. This year we’re inviting all iThemba Walkers to walk with a purpose, to join the crusade against breast cancer, to give from the heart and take some time to walk with us and help us raise funds for a good cause.”

The second virtual and 16th overall iThemba Walkathon is on Sunday, 3 October 2021.

Lillian Dube exaggerated the number of vibrators she owns

According to Avon Justine staff and select influencers in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban and Polokwane will also join the walk from Cansa offices in the various regions.

“Numbers for each of these regional walks will be kept in line with Covid-19 regulations. All the Walkathon activity from across the country will be shared on the official iThemba Walkathon social media platforms,” Avon said in a statement.

Registration entries for the walkathon are R180 for adults and R100 for children.

iThemba Walkathon walkers can register online at www.ithembawalkathon.co.za or at select Sportsman’s Warehouses.

All registration enquiries can be directed to avonjustinewalk@s4u.co.za or by calling by 012 880 26 35 during weekday working hours, on Saturday from 10am to 4pm or on Sundays and public holidays from 10am to 1pm.

The closing date for online entries is 25 September. In store registrations close on 15 September 2021.

Early bird entries to this year’s virtual walkathon will receive a gift bag consisting of an iThemba Walkathon 2021 collector’s T-shirt, Avon and Justine products and iThemba Walkathon 2021 collector’s buff.

Participants can choose to have the gift bag directly delivered to their homes for a nominal fee of R80.50 or they can choose to collect it free of charge at select Clicks stores.

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